Reading for Pleasure Wednesday: Edith Wharton

“Then the populace closes in again, so quickly and densely that it seems
impossible it could ever have been parted, and negro water-carriers,
muffled women, beggars streaming with sores, sinewy and greasy “saints,”
Soudanese sorcerers hung with amulets made of sardine-boxes and
hares’-feet, long-lashed boys of the Chleuh in clean embroidered
caftans, Jews in black robes and skull-caps, university students
carrying their prayer-carpets, bangled and spangled black women,
scrofulous children with gazelle eyes and mangy skulls, and blind men
tapping along with linked arms and howling out verses of the Koran,
surge together in a mass drawn by irresistible suction to the point
where the bazaars converge about the mosques of Moulay Idriss and El
Kairouiyin.”

–E. W., In Morocco (1917)

Axé.

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1 Comment

Filed under Bibliography

One response to “Reading for Pleasure Wednesday: Edith Wharton

  1. I have not read In Morocco, but this makes me want to do so.

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