Ramón Fernández

Theatrical distances, bronze shadows heaped
On high horizons, mountainous atmospheres
Of sky and sea.

It was her voice that made
The sky acutest at its vanishing.
She measured to the hour its solitude.
She was the single artificer of the world
In which she sang. And when she sang, the sea,
Whatever self it had, became the self
That was her song, for she was the maker. Then we,
As we beheld her striding there alone,
Knew that there never was a world for her
Except the one she sang and, singing, made.

Ramón Fernández, tell me, if you know,
Why, when the singing ended and we turned
Toward the town, tell why the glassy lights,
The lights in the fishing boats at anchor there,
As the night descended, tilting in the air,
Mastered the night and portioned out the sea,
Fixing emblazoned zones and fiery poles,
Arranging, deepening, enchanting night.

Oh! Blessed rage for order, pale Ramón,
The maker’s rage to order words of the sea,
Words of the fragrant portals, dimly-starred,
And of ourselves and of our origins,
In ghostlier demarcations, keener sounds.

Axé.

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2 Comments

Filed under Poetry

2 responses to “Ramón Fernández

  1. When I first loved this poem, I thought that it should end with “singing, made.” (I also, quite unoriginally, thought that Hamlet should end with “The rest is silence.”)

    I discovered the other week – on first proper re-reading in years – that I was wrong. You remind me. (I was wrong about Hamlet, too, but I figured that out a while ago.)

  2. What I didn’t realize for years was that R.F. was a real person!

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