“Christians are right, and pagans are wrong”

…and language is a set of grammar rules, and culture is a museum. These things are not true but I would have better teaching evaluations from both students and other faculty if I lived by them. I would allegedly run through my lecture and go back to the office and keep writing, and everything would be simple.

I would not mind such a scenario at all. Yet at the same time and at other schools, it is not bien vu to do that. And this was never a passion or career goal of mine but it remains a fact that I have become good at organizing an undergraduate major in a way and to a degree few are. Something I think we should do is precisely the sort of thing that I was taught was dangerous to organize because it is visibly teaching oriented, which meant it would destroy your image as a researcher.

But I am teaching a class in Cultural Studies and we are seeing The Couple in the Cage, and it will be International Week later in the term. During International Week the foreign students showcase their “cultures” — that is, their traditional foods, costumes, and folkloric dances — as a one-day fair or museum. I think we could participate with some Invisible Theatre, and some of Augusto Boal’s games for actors.

Axé.

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4 Comments

Filed under Bibliography, Movement, News, What Is A Scholar?

4 responses to ““Christians are right, and pagans are wrong”

  1. Hault sont li puis et li vals tenebrus!

  2. You are right because the actual research on teaching supports you, having borrowed all of your literary poststructural theories to fight the outdated structuralist positivist idiocy you deplore.

  3. Z

    “the actual research on teaching supports you, having borrowed all of your literary poststructural theories”

    SO true, that. Pedagogical literature is actually fun to read now. I was about to say I would have come up with my smart ideas without all that crazy theory but then it struck me: perhaps that is where I got my pedagogical ideas.

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