Category Archives: Bibliography

On primitivism and aristocracy

I do not agree with everything in this Appiah article on primitivism but there are some very interesting references in it.

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I have been in Utrecht for a week and it has changed me greatly. I want to live here. I looked at some notes I made the first day and I know so much more about the town now, and the Netherlands are so much more familiar now.

I have learned something important: the idea that was imposed upon me, that one should finish the Ph.D. in a field like letters, and then decide what to do with one’s life, is an aristocratic one, was what aristocrats actually did. It is not an odd neurosis of mine that one must first prove personhood via the Ph.D. and ideally tenure in a top place in a humanities field before going on with one’s life, finding ones true field and vocation — it is an aristocratic ideal that was actually communicated to me as a requirement.

This is very interesting. Parents who want children out of the nest, on the one hand, but want to tie them to it hand and foot, on the other. I had some other psychoanalytic insights as well, about early infancy.

Axé.

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Writing is the act of saying I

Joan Didion, again. “Writing is an aggressive, hostile act.” Trysh Travis:

[In] graduate teaching, this means helping students figure out what they are arguing about complex and multifaceted topics with which they tend to have, in clinical mental health terms, deeply codependent relationships. . . .

. . . bell hooks calls the process “coming to voice”. . . . Confidence in their own authority allows them to say both “this is my argument” and “that could be my argument, but it is not.”

Making such claims is scary; they entail a lot of responsibility. Traditional feminist pedagogy — indebted to the ethics of care — provides an easy jumping-off point for discussing the responsibility an author has to sources and audience. . . .

But we lack a feminist discourse that grapples with the fact that, as Didion explains, writing is “. . . an invasion, an imposition of the writer’s sensibility on the reader’s most private space.” To be clear, that aggression inheres . . . in the act of clearing space (in one’s head, on the page, in the scholarly conversation) for one’s own vision and voice.

Writing in standard academic English, “the act of saying ‘I’” always already occurs over and against the voices of others. Writers dialogue with some of those voices, but to most of the others, they must say, “That could be my argument, but it is not.”

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Mundos neoliberales

Here we have a very important article on the neoliberal university, that I will study, called “Contingent No More.” Related to it is the infantilization entailed in reducing citizens to consumers. This post mentions a book on advertising and persuasion, which according to Cliff Arroyo emphasizes infantilization as a key to coercion.

This journal Transmodernidad, that I should read more in general, also has in it Mignolo’s manifesto on decolonial thinking, that I should become able to discuss in a detailed way, and easily. “Epistemic disobedience” is the keyword.

“The social sciences are totally corrupt, and they don’t liberate themselves at all from the corruption, especially in those countries.” –Jean Franco, PMLA 131:3 (May 2016): 735. This is very interesting and I would like to hear more. These sciences are imbricated with a repressive state apparatus, I am assuming this means.

I’ve ordered Franco’s Cruel Modernity for the library and will read it. I’ve been reading about it and enjoying the reading. I see why Clarissa reacts as the does to Franco’s discussion of Luz Arce, but it appears to me Franco isn’t judging her but analyzing the function of her book. I’m finding the articles on Franco in the 2016 PMLA instructive for reasons going beyond the discussion of this book.

It’s exciting. My mind is clear and there is so much to read and write. To contemplate the experiences of past minds I’d like to read Defoe’s journal of the plague year, too.

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A chronicle of crisis

I want to read Bauman’s Social Europe book. Perhaps, since the book comes in non-traditional forms, this is something I will do while traveling.

I submitted something to my writing group but must not forget to do something with it once I get it back. It has potential to be overshadowed but should not.
After I finish this next paper I must keep working on it, dividing time between it, my out of field paper, and course preparation. Then the question of our grant proposal will come in, and I do not want to miss a beat now.

That means, of course, that I cannot participate in any of my typical self-destruction or self-doubt now; others need me to be whole and want to know what I have to say.

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Le conte du graal, ou le roman de Perceval

You have to order the version I want from France, it seems. Do you think I could get it in New York? And look, look at this film.

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Antropologías del sur

There are all these books, new books, amazing South American anthropology and theory books, that you can download from the Antropologías del sur site. There is also a really smart post about writing productivity.

I keep forgetting that I am slightly dissociative, or slightly withdrawn. I forget because it is almost imperceptible, and then I don’t understand myself when it happens. I have had a new and unexplained attraction to small children lately, and I wonder if the one I am looking for is me.

I have thought about access to self, and bringing more ego to things. If I address this small person directly, bring them along with me, it might help. It would be someone to get objective for, to be sweet to, to be positive for.

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Sur le corps

The March 2006 PMLA (121:2) is one of those I kept, to study, and am no longer because those articles are now available online and: you must clear out bookshelves if you are to see what you have.

I kept it because it had articles about the body and corporeality, including one on Descartes and another on Frederick Douglass and transnational blackness. So: transnational blackness was a Thing in Douglass’ time; there is a great deal more in this article. On Descartes: there is a Cartesian body, but it is not the mechanical one subject to coercion (Foucault). It is an aesthetic body (“aesthetic machine”).

I wonder. I was making these notes so I could recycle the journal, and remember to read online later. But perhaps these things are of interest for the current presentation, which has Descartes, blackness and the body in it.

Axé.

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