Category Archives: Poetry

Santa Cruz, Calif.

You lusciously unreconstructed tacky beach town delicious summer

Axé.

Leave a comment

Filed under Poetry

I hate composting (original text)

Another thing I hate is composting. It is one thing to do it outside but I hate kitchens with a nasty tub of compost by the sink and another nasty fermenting compost pail. People wonder why I do not cook and eat out but it is because I do not like the smell of this stuff. In addition, usually the houses in which composting is done are also dusty and cluttered, and their inhabitants, self-righteous and moralistic. It is such an awful atmosphere, composting, and I am not a hippie. Down with farmers’ markets, down with yoga, down with bicycles and Caltrain, down with sensible shoes, I hate them all, and I-280, and women who don’t wear makeup, and chlorinated pools.

Axé.

11 Comments

Filed under Banes, Poetry

Poetics

This is Marjorie Perloff’s very useful website and we should all use it for reference.

Axé.

Leave a comment

Filed under Poetry

Yves Bonnefoy

There is something at once very American and very French about this poem. (The translation is by Hoyt Rogers.) Like Emerson, Dickinson, and Frost, Bonnefoy subjects the forest to close, reverential observation, and reveals in it an earthly Eden. Yet there is also, in these lines, a sense that the vision is illusory, the melting material of dreams and symbols. It’s characteristic of Bonnefoy that his faithful description of passing through the woods on a snowy evening also gives him the metaphor of a blank piece of paper in the instant before a poem fills it.

Read the poem.

Axé.

Leave a comment

Filed under Poetry

That Vallejo panel

I must compose my to-do list: the Service Learning project, the Vallejo panel, the Curriculum and Instruction article, the Houston paper and its submission somewhere, and the Vallejo paper … not to mention the prison presentation. I also have the prize submission, the archival research, and the bureaucratic document on my own behalf.

For Vallejo, we have two new-to-me critical texts: one involving the October Revolution, El Tungsteno and Badiou, and a piece by Stephen Hart that talks about Vallejo the homo sacer (Angamben).

Homo sacer or “sovereign power and bare life” = sacred pariah, criminal, exile, wounded, flawed; I must discover what these things really mean. Hart’s piece is about self-respresentation and identity in Vallejo —  because Vallejo did produce himself and also get produced in certain ways.

My ideas on the matter at hand have to do with Borges, “La nadería de la personalidad,” and similar writings from the period.

Axé.

Leave a comment

Filed under Poetry, What Is A Scholar?, Working

The author as gesture, again

I do not know that I understand this text, yet, well enough to explain it, but I do remember writing a paper in graduate school entitled “Poetry as gesture in the criticism of Baudelaire.”

I might be able to find this paper again but it had ideas in it including the poem as event (something I had not thought of and did not express in that way). The poem was a gesture seen, and a gesture made. It was created in this convergence of vision and speech, and recreated in a parallel convergence when it was read, I said primitively.

Axé.

Leave a comment

Filed under Poetry, Working

Agamben or the author as gesture

Now I need Agamben for two different projects so I have no choice but to study. Here, the author is gesture.

Axé.

Leave a comment

Filed under Poetry, Race book