Henry Giroux Today

Having a bad day today. Maybe the hangover from being denied tenure by the right-wing stooge John Silber, the then president of Boston University, in 1981 still stings. Since those dark days, I have always had some hope in the university, recognizing that it was an important site of struggle and filled with contradictions. I am losing that hope. I consistently meet administrators who are not only unimaginative but cowardly and incapable of supporting programs whose value cannot be reduced to cost-efficiency metrics. These people do not just lack a vision, they constitute a kind of academic walking dead, albeit with the ever present smile on their faces–a kind of sickening embrace of civility. They are truly incapable of providing support and resources for faculty fighting for economic and political justice, faculty who take risks, join hands with those colleagues who have been reduced to Wal-mart workers, and act in solidarity with students who refuse to be reduced to customers. Where are the administrators from the ranks of the humanities and liberal arts? In too many instances we have dead-beat administrators drawn from the empirically based disciplines who do not have a clue as to what scholarship is about and increasingly reward the most unfit people with university awards, academic positions, and committee assignments–all the while making clear that qualified people should not apply. Rigorous and courageous scholarship has now gone the way of typewriter. Faculty are rewarded for committee work, grants, and a general attitude that can only be viewed as supine. Even worse, these individuals organize themselves in clicks exercising power that represents the worse form of cronyism. They barely publish, have no international reputations, and feed on gossip and innuendo, reproducing themselves in hires who mimic their own idiocy. I am sure there are exceptions in North America, but dark side of neoliberalism has just about killed the university as a democratic public sphere. All that is left is the detritus, filled with losers and dead beat careerists.

Axé.

2 Comments

Filed under ALFS presentation, Banes, Da Whiteman, What Is A Scholar?, Working

Taganka

So it is, dear descendants of Alexander Veniaminovich! The evening dedicated to our common ancestor is scheduled for May 24, Wednesday, at 18 o’clock at the House of the Russian Diaspora in Taganka Square, Moscow. There will be invitations. Write here, who and how many people are coming, or send me a personal message. Bring the children!

Значит так, дорогие потомки Александра Вениаминовича! Вечер, посвященный общему нашему родственнику, намечается на 24 мая, в среду, в 18 часов в Доме русского зарубежья на Таганке. Будут пригласительные билеты. Пишите сюда, кому сколько или мне в личку. Приводите детей!

Axé.

2 Comments

Filed under A.V. Bari, News

A flash of insight

Why did you not ask for advice and information?

Because I already knew that my father would not answer such questions. From this I had learned that answers would not be forthcoming from anyone.

Axé.

Leave a comment

Filed under Da Whiteman, Working

Aleksandr Veniaminovich as a young man

AlexanderBaryYoung

This is one of the photographs saved from the police in suitcases for 100 years. Only now has it been revealed.

Axé.

Leave a comment

Filed under A.V. Bari

Working at Librairie Gallimard

I wish I could remember the name of the main manager of the bookstore, he was old and expansive and would sit in the office smoking cigars and doing paperwork, perhaps even reading manuscripts now that I think of it. Then there was the under-manager, M. Paul, a neoliberal type. Every morning after Giscard was on tv he would be there early saying allez les gars … meaning that employee Gilles, the only man without some management position, should go up the ladder into the attic and bring down extra copies of the book in question. Fuentes’ Terra Nostra came out in French that summer and we had piles of it. I hadn’t read it but developed a spiel about it that impressed people, so I was stood by it to sell more of it.

Axé.

Leave a comment

Filed under Juegos, Poetry

On the corruption of Trump

I did not compile this myself, but here are some links to stories, many in the form of tweet threads with links to other stories, by journalists and others who are documenting the current web of corruption and conspiracy.

1. John Schindler aka @20committee. Former National Security guy, convervative, but realpolitik. Also loves cats.
Twitter: https://twitter.com/20committee
Start here and scroll back to read up to present:
2. Megathread summary of pre-election conspiracy by Seth Abramson, poet, English professor, but also reporter.Start with the first tweet, and read the numbered tweets that follow, with links to articles. There are at least 40 tweets:
3. Louise Mensch, former Tory member of parliament, journalist, also conservative, but doing great reporting on the campaign collusion with Putin:
4. Article on why calling your reps matters:
5. The Moscow Project. Crowd-sourcing the Steele dossier (British intelligence agent who pulled together a dossier on Trump and Russian connections that was reported on last year, but published by Buzzfeed in January): https://themoscowproject.org/dossier.html
6. Khanoisseur https://twitter.com/Khanoisseur Adam Khan is exclelent at following the money, Russion money, Chinese money, etc. See these twitter threads:
On oil:
Putin, Assad, European refugee crisis:
7. Sarah Kendizior, has done a lot of work in Uzbekistan.
on cast of characters:
On autocracy:
Who are “these people””
Podcast:
8. Andrea Chalupa on Putin and Syria:
9. Legendary hacker:
10. Timothy O’Brien on Trump crony Felix Sater, money laundering, real estate, influence peddling:
and
11. Putin’s most recent assassinations:
and attempts to influence other countries:
12. Washington Post calls for Nunes to be investigated:
13. Other GOP politician in Iowa who came out against Trumpcare:
Axé.

Leave a comment

Filed under News, Uncategorized

Henrietta Kahn’s family names

Only I will understand these notes, mais le blog, c’est à moi.

Henrietta S. Kahn’s nephew Dr. Hugo Adolfovich Leventhal was from Riga but lived in Moscow, in the house of Aleksandr Bari. Hugo was the daughter of Henrietta’s sister Rose, who lived in Riga. His father would be Adolf Leventhal.

There is a picture of him with Henrietta, via our cousins Leventhal-Bari-Efron (Sergei Efron, husband of Marina Tsvetaeva). I do not yet understand exactly who these people are. Reasoning: Leventhal and Bari are names we know already, and Efron appears to be related by marriage.

There is also a family picture with Boris Pasternak on his 17th birthday, in 1907.

Axé.

Leave a comment

Filed under A.V. Bari